“Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Great Gray Owl, Dairyland, Wisconsin.  Rarely seen in the open, Great Grays' plumage blends in so well with the surrounding forest that they’re called “the Phantom of the Forest.”  During the 2004-2005 irruption, hundreds of Great Grays were driven South from Canada by a summer drought that depleted the supply of the voles and pocket gophers they eat. This Great Gray was one of over a dozen sitting out in the open along a busy road, listening for rodents tunneling under the snow, doing its best to cope with an out of balance planet.

Great Gray Owl, Dairyland, Wisconsin.

Rarely seen in the open, Great Grays' plumage blends in so well with the surrounding forest that they’re called “the Phantom of the Forest.”

During the 2004-2005 irruption, hundreds of Great Grays were driven South from Canada by a summer drought that depleted the supply of the voles and pocket gophers they eat. This Great Gray was one of over a dozen sitting out in the open along a busy road, listening for rodents tunneling under the snow, doing its best to cope with an out of balance planet.

Owls have 14 vertebrae in their necks, allowing them to rotate their head 270 degrees.  To give the owl its space and do no harm, I used a 300mm lens.

Owls have 14 vertebrae in their necks, allowing them to rotate their head 270 degrees.

To give the owl its space and do no harm, I used a 300mm lens.

Nature’s vibration is perfect” - Bob Proctor