Why I make pictures

A local newspaper article this week reported there are many hate groups in Ohio.

Contrary to what the media would have us believe, our world is full of love.

Paris is just one example.

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Love and joy are all around us at home, too.

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This is why I always wear my camera.

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All we have to do is open our hearts and our minds.

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“Laughter is the sun that drives the winter from the human face” - Victor Hugo

“Laughter is the sun that drives the winter from the human face” - Victor Hugo

Making pictures preserves these moments of joy and love, and is my way of sharing what’s right in our world.

Thanks for reading, and for joining me in celebrating the good.

“You can't fix anything by condemning it. That only adds to the destructive energy that's already permeating the atmosphere.” - Dr. Wayne Dyer

What's the Difference Between Fiber-based and RC Prints?

Back in the day photographers printed almost all black and white pictures on fiber-based paper. Fiber-based paper is just that - a photographic emulsion on a base of paper, which is made from wood fibers.

To ensure the highlights reflect enough light and that the shadows absorb enough light, manufacturers add a layer of barium sulfate. As a result, photographers sometimes call fiber-based paper “baryta” paper. 

In 1975, Kodak began to offer resin-coated, or “RC” paper. A layer of polyethylene, or resin, separates the emulsion from the paper base.

Because the paper base is separate from the emulsion, RC prints develop more quickly, and require only a five-minute wash as opposed to an hour or two for fiber-based paper. RC paper’s reduced processing time appealed to news and other photographers working on a deadline. 

Fiber-based prints depict a greater tonal range, partly because fiber-based paper’s semi-glossy surface (compared to RC prints) reflects less light in the deep blacks of the image.

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Although fiber-based prints require more processing time and must be flattened and then carefully dried, their greater tonal range makes them more valuable to fine art print buyers, and they command a higher price than an RC print does.

RC prints' utility stems from their quick drying time and ease of mounting. Many clients find them more suitable to their needs and budget. 

Working with film and printing in a traditional wet darkroom, I enjoy the best of both worlds - Fiber-based and RC. 

Photo: The Art of Living, La Brasserie de Île Saint-Louis, Paris.  

Photo and text © Bob Soltys All Rights Reserved